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Quintiles, Scottish health boards partner to accelerate research

Monday, October 1, 2012

Quintiles, a fully integrated biopharmaceutical services company, formed a strategic partnership with the four teaching health boards—Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow—in Scotland as part of its Prime Site program to accelerate the development of new and more effective medicines.

According to National Health Service Research Scotland (NRS) and other health organizations, while the overall health of Scotland’s citizens is improving, it remains below that of other Western European countries. This strategic partnership is designed to increase access to clinical trials for both patients and investigators, accelerating the collection of data about the safety and efficacy of investigational therapies.

The partnership builds on Quintiles’ long experience and success in working with NHS Scotland’s four university-based academic research centers already mentioned. These sites have broad therapeutic expertise and a reputation for high-quality research. With about 30 Quintiles studies open at any one time and the Scottish government’s Chief Scientist Office strongly focused on metrics, Scotland has the foundation to become a leader in clinical trial recruitment and study start-up.

As part of the partnership, Quintiles will introduce new technology that uses electronic health records to improve the identification of patients for potential inclusion in clinical research.

“Scotland has a significant burden of disease and a huge need to speed the development of new therapies that will help people live healthier lives,” said Lindy Jones, global head of integrated site services, Quintiles. “We have a successful track record of collaboration with Scottish government and health care organizations. This partnership will further enhance our ability to recruit patients and investigators—two groups critical to an efficient and effective drug development process.”

Alex Neil, secretary for health and well-being, Scotland cabinet, said, “Bringing more research trials to Scotland will reap benefits for patients, by speeding up the development of new medical therapies and enhancing the health care treatment options that are on offer for patients.”

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